Photography equipment for portraits - http://portraitsbytoler.com

Stainless Steel Tank With 2





Developing Black and White Film at Home & DIY Film Washer Instructions

Here is the plumbing hardware you'll need: 4" ABS Closet Flange with knockout plug 12" to 18" of 4" ABS pipe 4" inset test plug 1/4" to 1/2" brass barb splice coupling 1/4" to 1/2" tubing (the length with be determined by your setup) 1/4" to 1/2"... Most of the few 1-hour photo labs can't even process it. Yes, there are C-41 (a chemical process used for color negative film) b&w film stocks, and a handful of labs in larger metro areas still able/willing to process true silver halide negatives. On the bottom of the tank is listed the correct amount of chemistry you should use in the tank with film-loaded reels inside. Stainless steel reels have greater longevity, look classy, provide a bit more space for your chemistry to touch the film, but can be a pain to load for beginners. But film, like a palette of oils, is merely a medium of the art of photography and is not supplanted by its digital analogue, although one could argue that it has been slightly eclipsed by it. I still remember when film was the only  option, then... An additional challenge with loading your film comes with 120 and 220 film rolls. If you want to dedicate a closet to changing film, you could install a convenient shelf and even a film canister opener on its surface. Pushing film essentially means you ignore the inscribed ISO rating of the film and use it at a higher speed. Completely empty the tank every 3 minutes or so. Empty the tank, or put the washed roll back into the empty, rinsed tank, and fill (about 600cc with my tank) with distilled water. Even so, I also recommend that you sacrifice a roll of film and practice in the daylight until you're comfortable—or better yet, until you don't even have to think about it. Now, since this MUST BE DONE IN COMPLETE DARKNESS, to demonstrate, I'll... The Dotline kit I've recommended can process 2x 35mm rolls at a time or a single roll of 120 film. There are stainless steel tanks that are branded as professional  quality. Get your film roll, spool, developing tank and lid, bottle opener, and scissors. Then you can start to twist the ends of the reel back and forth and you should feel the film feeding into it. You'll notice if it isn't fed properly: you'll feel a lot of resistance. Theoretically, you can simply use your developing tank to rinse film. Instead of loading outside, winding the film inward, you start at the innermost part of the reel, moving outward along the spiral wire structure. Getting the film onto the reel is a tricky process. This is where you start feeding the film onto the reel. 120 film has a paper back which has to be removed before it goes on the reel. The Dotline reels are easy-loading reels. Next, take your reel and find the two large tabs of the reel. Find the bottom of the roll (the end without the film axel protruding) and use your bottle opener to pry the metal cap off of the roll. I've had the best luck with the Dotline tank/reel combo kit. You can and should  practice with a roll of film that has been developed and/or you don't care about—a junk roll, if you will. For example, a 1-liter mix of Ilford ID-11 will process about 10 rolls of film, and will last up to 6 months if kept in a temperature controlled area, sealed in a container out of direct light. These are much more expensive and do not usually include the steel reels to go with them as part of a kit. You can use film changing bags, some use a 100% dark, no cracks or gaps closet, as for me, I have a snowmobile suit that no longer fits. Pour the developer moderately into the developer tank, making sure not to overfill. The first time I loaded one of these with 120 film I ended up with the emulsion touching and the result was undeveloped segments of negative. Ilford Perceptol, for instance, only develops 4 rolls of film and is much more sensitive to light and air. If you have a stop bath, follow the instructions provided with it. If you're just using water, fill the tank and empty it several times to make sure remaining developer is as diluted as possible. Use of gloves while mixing chemicals and processing film is recommended. shooting and developing  ISO 400 film as if it was ISO 800, 1600, or even 3200 if you're brave. With all this in mind, one workflow might be to process film in batches, e. g. 10 rolls all at once. Now, I have to stress that this is just one  method of developing your own film at home. Cleaning up spills immediately will help the location where you develop film smell less like a photo lab. I don't know if university courses still follow this pattern, but we started out using film, not digital, for my Photo 101 course. Drying film is, to me, the most tense part of the process. shooting and developing ISO 400 film as if it was 200, or 100. When I opened my first canister of film with the intent of developing it, I realized how much I had forgotten. The design of the film washer is to direct water from the bottom of the pipe out of the top, flowing over the sides. You've got your film shot, you can now begin the process. Others may require you to dilute 1:2, 1:4, etc. There is a definite change in the appearance of the emulsion side of the film when it's dry vs wet. 220 doesn't have a paper back, but like 120, is a large size negative and is a bit trickier to finagle onto the reel to get it started. ) ago I talked about gathering all of the supplies and the general excitement regarding my desire to take up film photography once again. Generally, it's more common and gives more consistent results to push film than to pull. (No, I'm not being paid to shill for Ilford, I just like their film stock. Once it has come off, the small film spool inside should easily slide out. Fingerprints can still show up easily on the film because of the oils in your skin. I hope it helps those who still want to keep their film photography alive. I usually use about 1/2 tsp or so. This method does not require squeegeeing the negatives. Black and white film, for example has become an even more remote alternative for the layman photographer. A key point in developing is the agitation/inversion of the tank … full of chemicals. Pulling the film is the exact opposite. Film is not dead. After a short distance the film will catch on some ball bearings. In the past I've used a Tmax analogue called TF-2 from  Photographers' Formulary  which gave me great results. This is why I recommend the easy-loading reels. Empty the tank of as much water as you can. There is a space in the center of the tank where you can see the fluid level. At this point you can remove the lid of your tank. A tank with a tight-sealing lid is a must. DO NOT UNSCREW THE LID OFF THE TANK YET. Some chemicals can be mixed into 1L working solutions, so a 1L container will work fine. The working life of most photo chemistry is determined mainly by time and the total number of rolls developed. If your own workflow or client demand don't allow for that, you'll need to assess the best course of action: buying larger quantities of chemicals, splitting jobs between home and the lab, etc. If you're not using a washer, aim the water from your tap into the center, making sure it's around the same temperature (68º F / 20º C) to avoid damaging the negatives. If your sink curvature is too round so that the flange base cannot sit level/steady (the base is typically 6" to 8" wide), or the sink just isn't big enough, you may not want to build one of these. Bull clips can  work, but eventually they start to rust, and you don't want rust on your negatives. Heck, you can use orange juice and coffee to develop negatives… true story. As part of the course curriculum, we learned all of the developing and printmaking processes, and it was good knowledge to draw upon. I've put together this simple guide based on what I remember, and what new research I've done on the subject. You should rinse the negatives for about 10-15 minutes, depending on the requirements of the fixer you're using.

Dec 26, 2009 by Analog | Posted in Photography

How to properly load stainless steel reels for developing?

So lately I got a stainless steel tank for darkoom use. Having previously used the notoriously easy to load Paterson system, the metal reels are much harder. The problem is that I'm getting kinks in the film when I load into the reel and after I develop, I notice patches of white, undeveloped sections where the film kinked and touched one another, preventing chemicals from reaching it. This has cost me several frames, including a rather nice pan of a bus. I'm loading by cutting off the leader and wrapping the rebate around the center post of the reel, then slowly winding film into the reel from the center outwards. This is with 35mm by the way. I cannot imagine how hard it would be to load 120 into these things.


Its just a question of practice. After years of using these I find the Paterson notoriously difficult. If you have the type of reel that has the metal prongs, snip the film so you have intact sprocket holes at the edge. This part can be done in the light - the leader has been exposed anyway. Ease a tad out of the cartridge, snip, ease the film onto the sprockets or under the wire and into the bag or loading room you go. You can now choose to remove the film from the cartridge or not - and I found it easier not to remove the film from the cartridge when I first began. Hold the film/cartridge in your right hand and the reel in your left, gently guide the film edges with your right finger and thumb and rotate the reel counterclockwise with your left hand in 1/4 turns. Gently press the edges of the film with your thumb and index finger so it is slightly arched. The film should slide onto the reel with no crinkle noises. If you hear crinkling, back the film off gently and try again. When you're done, snip the tail off of the cartridge and with your pinky gently guide it onto the reel. Leaving it in the cartridge does risk a scratch from dust, but I felt this was more than offset by proper loading and no little 1/2 moon fingerprints. If you choose to take it out of the cartridge before loading, be sure it is wound up tightly and that your hands are dry (no sweat!) Then the only thing that will get you good at this is practice. Practice. Practice. Buy some cheap color negative and practice with your eyes closed. And then it'll be like riding a bike.

jeannie | Dec 26, 2009
frediwhite@verizon.net | Dec 25, 2009
Check the distance between the reel halves, and try not to pull harder than you need to while loading. You can detect buckled places by feel, with practice. Try loading a roll of developed film in daylight so you can see what's happening; that may help refine your technique.
Ben H | Dec 26, 2009
You've had some good answers, and answers that basically describe how I do it. The one thing I'd add is that I find it much, much easier to load 120 than 35mm. I think the biggest reason for this is that it's so much shorter, so there are fewer opportunities to mess up. Also, because of this, the film is further apart, and the guides on the reel are larger. Just keep practicing-first in the daylight with a roll of cheap film, then with your eyes closed, and finally in the dark. I prefer SS reels over plastic, because they're so much faster and can be loaded wet.
Oct 08, 2007 by Lola | Posted in Photography

how do you develop 120 film?

i want to try to develop 120 film by myself instead of sending it out. could anyone explain the process to me and what i would need in order to develop it? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Another QUESTION: ok. so lets say i decide to use 35m film. after i get it processed, i've been told i need to scan the negatives myself. can i just use a regular scanner? or what should i use?


1) A light-tight room aka a darkroom or a changing bag 2) Stainless steel developing tank with a 120 stainless steel reel (there are plastic ones available but not recommended) 3) Chemicals: a) Developer (check the data sheet with your film for what is recommended); b) Stop Bath; c) Fixer; d) Running water for washing the film 4) A film squeegee to remove excess water after hanging the film in a dust-free environment to dry 5) Darkroom thermometer, measuring cups (usually in milliliters) timer 6) Scissors You will need to practice loading the film on the reel and that is best done, initially, in room light. So you'll have to "sacrifice" a roll. The reel has a spring clip that holds the film. Once you're removed the backing and trimmed the end of the film from the paper that attached it to the spool, grasp the film between thumb and forefinger and "bow" it slightly. Get it firmly placed under the spring clip and, holding it 'bowed", turn the reel counterclockwise and feed the film into the reel. As it "unbows" the film will nestle into the guides of the reel. Practice a few times and then do it with your eyes closed. Place the reel in the developing tank and place the lid on. In your darkroom or changing bag you have to do what you've done during practice only in total darkness. Once the film is safely in the tank with the lid on you can take it out of the changing bag. Actual processing is done under room light. When mixing your chemicals temperture is critical. 68 degrees is usually recommended. Time, for developing the film, is also critical. Agitation should be every couple of minutes - gentle agitation. Just turn the tank from top up to top down a few times - slowly. For printing you'll need an enlarger. There should be quite a selection on ebay or at keh.com or bhphotovideo.com. Make

| Oct 08, 2007
fhotoace | Oct 08, 2007
You need to take a photo class. Developing film is a precise process and takes a few times to get it right. Home? There is a problem with developing film at home ...first is what do you do with the used chemicals. The cannot be put down the drain or put into your trash ... the are hazardous waste. The other is you must have a dust free area to dry the negatives over night. Harder than most people think. The cost of the developing tank, reels, accurate thermometer, graduates and chemicals may cost you over a hundred dollars.
Edwin | Oct 08, 2007
1) A light-tight room aka a darkroom or a changing bag 2) Stainless steel developing tank with a 120 stainless steel reel (there are plastic ones available but not recommended) 3) Chemicals: a) Developer (check the data sheet with your film for what is recommended); b) Stop Bath; c) Fixer; d) Running water for washing the film 4) A film squeegee to remove excess water after hanging the film in a dust-free environment to dry 5) Darkroom thermometer, measuring cups (usually in milliliters) timer 6) Scissors You will need to practice loading the film on the reel and that is best done, initially, in room light. So you'll have to "sacrifice" a roll. The reel has a spring clip that holds the film. Once you're removed the backing and trimmed the end of the film from the paper that attached it to the spool, grasp the film between thumb and forefinger and "bow" it slightly. Get it firmly placed under the spring clip and, holding it 'bowed", turn the reel counterclockwise and feed the film into the reel. As it "unbows" the film will nestle into the guides of the reel. Practice a few times and then do it with your eyes closed. Place the reel in the developing tank and place the lid on. In your darkroom or changing bag you have to do what you've done during practice only in total darkness. Once the film is safely in the tank with the lid on you can take it out of the changing bag. Actual processing is done under room light. When mixing your chemicals temperture is critical. 68 degrees is usually recommended. Time, for developing the film, is also critical. Agitation should be every couple of minutes - gentle agitation. Just turn the tank from top up to top down a few times - slowly. For printing you'll need an enlarger. There should be quite a selection on ebay or at keh.com or bhphotovideo.com. Make
Bob | Oct 08, 2007
C-41, E-6, or black and white? C-41 is a pain to deal with. E-6 is a little better but still temperamental. B&W is just right...There are enough web resources out there that retyping it here is ludicrous. Film scanner is the best way to scan. Some flatbeds are getting reasonable results ie. Epson V700/V750 with medium format stock.

Stainless Steel Tank With 2 35mm Film Reels - Bookshelf


192 pages

The New Darkroom Handbook

Creator: Joe DeMaio, Roberta Worth, Dennis Curtin | Photography - 2012-11-12

Film. Tanks. and. Reels. Photographers using 35mm or 2 1/4 format film are confronted with thedifficulties of ... in three variations: stainless steeltanks andreels, plastic tanksandreels, and a combination of stainlesssteel tanks with plastic tops.

Publisher: CRC Press

About this book
The Darkroom Handbook, Second Edition, is a completely revised and updated version of a classic guide to the best design, construction, and equipment to use when setting up a darkroom. This book features ideas and money-saving tips on how to put a darkroom almost anywhere in your home or apartment. It takes you inside darkrooms of photographers around the world including those of famous photographers such as, Harry Callahan, Aaron Siskind, Berenice Abbott, and W. Eugene Smith. In addition, it contains detailed do-it-yourself plans for the most essential darkroom components, cutouts and design grids to plan that "dream" darkroom, and special sections on the color darkroom and the digital darkroom.



168 pages

Workbook of Darkroom Techniques

Creator: John Hedgecoe | Photography - 1997

For 35mm and roll film, you need a spiral tank. This is a cylindrical type, made either of stainless steel or plastic, containing a reel with a spiral groove to hold the film in place. For sheet film ... Plastic tank and spiral 2. Stainless steel tank and ...

Publisher: Focal Press

About this book
The Workbook of Darkroom Techniques is the perfect introduction to home processing and printing. It provides a breadth of information on a variety of equipment, materials, and techniques. This book provides the information needed to make good photographs into great prints, to rectify mistakes, and manipulate images so as to express the photographer's unique vision. Highly illustrated with color throughout.Full of hints and tricks to make the best possible images.Workbook format makes this a highly accessible reference.



304 pages

Police Photography

Creator: Larry S. Miller, Richard T. McEvoy Jr. | Law - 2010-12-16

2. In complete darkness, pry off the flat end of the 35mm cassette with a bottle opener, a Capro film cartridge opener, or a ... If you are using a center-loading reel-type tank, hold the film by its edges and press slightly so that the film buckles in ... Agitate a tank like the Nikor stainless steel tank by turning it upside down gently.

Publisher: Elsevier

About this book
This helpful textbook teaches the fundamentals of photography and their application to police work. It offers clear explanations of the basic elements of photography that are used in investigative police work. Recommendations regarding equipment and techniques are offered throughout for both small and large police departments. Topics include the advantages and disadvantages of digital photography, and guidelines for photographing accidents, crimes, evidence, questioned documents, and identification photos, and dealing with special situations such as homicide and arson.Step-by-step instructions show both experienced and inexperienced photographers the best way to capture specific situations encountered in law enforcement.A wide variety of photographs and illustrations demonstrate techniques and complement the material. A glossary provides a quick reference for looking up important definitions.


Darkroom and Developing Directory

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Promoted item:Samigon Stainless Steel Developing Tank w/ 2 35mm Reels (ALL BRAND NEW)

How to load 35mm Film into Development Tank - YouTube
How to load 35mm film into the film development tank and reel for processing. Visit http://www.GuidetoFilmPhotography.com for more processing and darkroom ...

Loading 120 Film Onto Stainless Steel Reels - YouTube
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Promoted item:Pro Universal Film Developing Tank for Processing 2 x 35mm or 120 Medium Format


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  • Adorama

    Adorama Stainless Steel Daylight Film Developing Tank for Two Rolls of 35mm Film or One Roll Of 120/220 Film

    Photography (Adorama)

    Rating (4 reviews):
    (4.5/5)
    Adorama

    Adorama will be my only choice

    0 5/5 Danielle Best (Wayne, MI, USA) - See all my reviews, August 15, 2007

    Great quality.

    0 5/5 Sarah - See all my reviews Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?) This review is from: Adorama Stainless Steel Daylight Film Developing Tank for Two Rolls of 35mm Film or One Roll Of 120/220 Film (Electronics) Everything about this tank is excellent. I've developed film using this tank and I am quite pleased. I bought reels with it, but didn't like Them. This tank was completely light tight. 0 Help other customers find the most helpful reviews  Was this review helpful to you? , January 29, 2014

    good but small

    0 3/5 Yvonne Fromm - See all my reviews Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?) This review is from: Adorama Stainless Steel Daylight Film Developing Tank for Two Rolls of 35mm Film or One Roll Of 120/220 Film (Electronics) does the job but was hard to find a reel that fit properly. The one I ordered and thought would work was way too big. 0 Help other customers find the most helpful reviews  Was this review helpful to you? , December 16, 2012


  • Kalt

    Adorama Ultra Universal Plastic Daylight Film Developing Tank for Film Sizes, 35mm, 120 and 220

    Photography (Kalt)

    Rating (11 reviews):
    (3.5/5)
    Kalt

    Photography student and in love with these!

    0 5/5 Shutterbug - See all my reviews Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?) This tank and reels is amazing! I am a photography student, and while in the darkroom I was using the reels that my university supplies. They are terrible. They are come about 40 years ago, and have the small feeds tongues that you can't get the film in. I got fed up of spending 40mins trying to load my reels, I bought these, and a film retriever and never had troubles again. Now I can load my film in over half the time. These reels are amazing and so incredibly easy to use! I would suggest getting the retriever too. Makes life so much easier! 0 Help other customers find the most helpful reviews  Was this review helpful to you? , March 10, 2011

    The tank

    0 5/5 Derron Dorton (Provo, UT) - See all my reviews, October 13, 2007

    Rokunar Developing Tank

    0 4/5 Dantucke - See all my reviews Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?) The plastic inserts have the guides for rolling on your film which make it much easier, especially in the dark. I never had any trouble with light exposure to my film however the lid often leaked when mixing around the solution in the tank. I loved having 2 inserts so I could develop 2 rolls of film at once. 0 Help other customers find the most helpful reviews  Was this review helpful to you? , November 4, 2010


  • Adorama

    Adorama Stainless Steel Daylight Film Developing Tank for Four Rolls of 35mm Film or Two Rolls of 120/220 Film

    Photography (Adorama)

    Rating (2 reviews):
    (4.0/5)
    Adorama

    A developing tank !

    0 5/5 Leo - See all my reviews Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?) This review is from: Adorama Stainless Steel Daylight Film Developing Tank for Four Rolls of 35mm Film or Two Rolls of 120/220 Film (Electronics) Not much to say besides that it's a four roll developing tank with a plastic cap.. I prefer stainless caps but needed this in a hurry. Does what it's supposed to do. 0 Help other customers find the most helpful reviews  Was this review helpful to you? , December 19, 2013

    I miss the old stainless tanks.

    0 3/5 P. Opp "the Animator" (Denver, CO) - See all my reviews, May 10, 2013


  • Kalt

    Kalt Stainless Steel Reel -NP10110 (35mm)

    Photography (Kalt)

    Rating (2 reviews):
    (3.0/5)
    Kalt

    Defective tracks.

    0 1/5 Matt - See all my reviews Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?) This review is from: Kalt Stainless Steel Reel -NP10110 (35mm) (Electronics) The good:-Price-MetalThe bad:-Poor qualityThe main issue I have with this reel is that one of the tracks which secures the film is defected and will fail to keep the strip of film from touching itself. This issue was noticeable when I first attempted to load a roll of practice film into the reel, and was confirmed when I tried to develop a roll the next day. Ruined five frames out of 26.The other issue is the mounting mechanism/clamp which holds one end of the film to aid loading. It is a thin wire and will consistently cut into the end of the strip.I have since ordered another reel of higher price (and much higher quality). 0 Help other customers find the most helpful reviews  Was this review helpful to you? , January 30, 2013

    Ken Parks' review of Stainless Steel Reel

    0 5/5 Ken Parks "viswizard" (Johns Creek, GA USA) - See all my reviews, January 26, 2013